Volunteers

Being invited to live and work alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a rare privilege and a unique opportunity to make a personal contribution to practical reconciliation.

ICV volunteers generously offer their time and skills reflecting their commitment to helping Indigenous communities create a brighter future, for generations to come.

What has volunteering with ICV taught me about myself? That we are not always successful, but that’s life. We learn from our mistakes and if we don’t “give it a go”, then surely we will never be successful.

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Joanna Lester, 29, is originally from London but now lives in Sydney. She is a freelance broadcast and print journalist, working at the ABC, SBS, Sydney Morning Herald, Associated Press, and covering international rugby league.

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Danielle Pogos’ journey began with ICV after being inspired by Ian Thorpe’s work with Aboriginal communities. She volunteered on school holiday programs in the Martu Lands, remote WA, and enjoyed the experience so much, that her career has taken an exciting new direction as a result.

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Dr Barry Kentish is affectionately known to ICV as “The Beekeeper from Ballarat”. This light-hearted title belies a wealth of experience which he has willingly shared with Indigenous communities on various projects as an ICV volunteer since 2007.

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Bob is 65 and lives with his wife in Culcairn, NSW. He is involved with Rotary, listens to infants reading twice a week, visits an aged hostel and plays lawn bowls. And in his spare time he shares his plumbing knowledge and skills with Indigenous communities through ICV projects.

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What has volunteering with ICV taught me about myself? That we are not always successful, but that’s life. We learn from our mistakes and if we don’t “give it a go”, then surely we will never be successful.

Read More

Joanna Lester, 29, is originally from London but now lives in Sydney. She is a freelance broadcast and print journalist, working at the ABC, SBS, Sydney Morning Herald, Associated Press, and covering international rugby league.

Read More

Danielle Pogos’ journey began with ICV after being inspired by Ian Thorpe’s work with Aboriginal communities. She volunteered on school holiday programs in the Martu Lands, remote WA, and enjoyed the experience so much, that her career has taken an exciting new direction as a result.

Read More

Dr Barry Kentish is affectionately known to ICV as “The Beekeeper from Ballarat”. This light-hearted title belies a wealth of experience which he has willingly shared with Indigenous communities on various projects as an ICV volunteer since 2007.

Read More

Bob is 65 and lives with his wife in Culcairn, NSW. He is involved with Rotary, listens to infants reading twice a week, visits an aged hostel and plays lawn bowls. And in his spare time he shares his plumbing knowledge and skills with Indigenous communities through ICV projects.

Read More

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I apply to become a volunteer?

Thank you for your interest in volunteering for ICV.

Currently, there are no new volunteer positions.

Please bookmark this webpage and visit us again.

In the meantime, there are many other ways to support ICV and the communities we work with. You could:

  • Help set up a workplace giving program with your employer
  • Sign-up as a Region Sponsor and make a monthly donation
  • Sign-up as a Community friend and make a monthly donation
  • Leave us a gift in your Will
  • Follow us on Facebook or Twitter
  • Sign-up to receive Coo-e-news
  • Tell a friend about ICV and how, together, we are working to make a positive difference to the lives of Indigenous people across Australia.

Do I need formal qualifications?

No, you do not need formal qualifications. We need people with many different capabilities and backgrounds.

How long will it take to be assigned a project?

ICV’s projects are driven and led by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities that we work with. We work at their invitation and at their pace. All project placements are determined by the community. The final decision on which volunteer will be placed on the project rests with the community. It is difficult to state with any certainty how long it will take until you go on a project, and we can offer no guarantee of a placement.

Do I have to get a new police check if I had one done recently?

Yes, ICV conducts a police check on all its volunteers. Some people already have police checks for other positions, but we have checks done to ensure that we protect the communities with whom we work. ICV pays for the police checks. The results of the police checks are, of course, confidential.

Am I too young, too old to be a volunteer?

Anyone from 18 years of age can be a volunteer.

How long are projects?

The length of our projects is determined by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. They can range from a few days to many months. Requirements are increasingly for long-term projects. Some projects can have a number of stages. The stages can be completed by the same volunteer if they are available, or by different volunteers.

Are all volunteer opportunities in remote communities?

No, ICV works with communities all across Australia in remote, regional and urban areas.

I am self employed, who do I list as a professional referee?

If you own your own business you can list clients or other professionals with whom you have dealings.

I have a medical condition, can I volunteer?

Yes, as long as it is safe for you to do so. As part of the application process, you are required to complete a medical check. On this form your doctor verifies that your health status is suitable for you to volunteer with ICV. We do not discriminate against people with medical conditions or people with disabilities. If you do have a medical condition, you may be considered for an urban project where access to medical and health services is available. All volunteers are required to have a new medical check every two years if you wish to continue volunteering with ICV.

How are volunteers chosen for a project?

Volunteers are registered on ICV’s volunteer database. If your skills are identified as a match for a current project you will be contacted by the volunteer team to go through the screening process if you haven’t already done so. Our Community Development Officers will then contact you to see if you are interested and available for a project. If you are, we will discuss your application - and possibly others - with the community to help them make a decision. Our Community Development Officers stay in touch with our volunteers throughout this whole process.

What is the Volunteer Induction Program (VIP)?

The Volunteer Induction Program (VIP) is a workshop that provides volunteers with important cross-cultural awareness and other information to assist you in preparing for your project. The program is also an important way for us to explain what you can expect from ICV and also discuss your responsibilities to us. Volunteers are the face of our organisation, so it is critical you understand and demonstrate ICV’s values when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The VIP is the last part of the screening process, it is a chance for staff and volunteers to discuss ICV’s values and operations and decide whether we are a good fit for each other.

Is travel to the project organised and paid for by ICV?

Yes. ICV will organise and pay for travel expenses to and from the project.

Who provides accommodation while I am volunteering?

Accommodation for our volunteers is the responsibility of the community where the project is to be done. Accommodation varies from community to community. ICV checks with communities regarding the suitability of the accommodation and in the majority of cases will have inspected the accommodation prior to placing a volunteer.

How long is the screening process and why do I have to go through it?

The screening process is like applying for a job. Once we receive your application, we will review it to see whether your skills are currently needed.

If they are, we will call you to arrange a phone interview, then we will call your referees. If you are successful in the first two steps you will be asked to attend a cultural awareness workshop. The whole process can take up to several weeks.

If your skills are not currently required, add you to our database to receive regular volunteer updates. If your skills are subsequently matched to the needs of a community we will contact you and you will be invited to go through the screening process.